Western King Prawn


King prawns are one of the most popular species of prawn in Australia, due no doubt to their rich flavour and moist flesh. There are two species eastern and western - with no major noticeable flavour differences. They are extremely versatile and excellent for display purposes. The simplest way to cook the prawns is fried on a barbeue. You can either butterfly and cook shell side down until they start to go opaque, a quick flip and sear, then serve with a rich fresh chimi churri sauce. Or peel first, run a skewer up the flesh to hold straight and cook both sides, serving with a dipping sauce. King Prawns are also lovely coated. Suggested coatings include batters (regular or tempura) with a touch of saffron. Crumbs made from brioche make a good match with the sweetness of the prawns. Blend in saffron, turmeric, cumin or ground coriander for added flavour.Cook the prawn in the shell as this will keep the juices and flavour inside. It can however make the prawn messy to eat and impossible to devein prior to serving. If the prawn is cleaned first, leave the tail tip and head on for good presentation. If curried prawns are on the menu, use a light style of curry with coconut milk so as not to overpower the flavour of the prawn. Prawn cocktail is always popular and can be made more exotic by adding mango or fresh citrus fruits and light dressings or mayonnaise. Appropriate sauces and accompaniments for king prawns include chilli, coriander, citrus, garlic, curry (light), ginger, burnt butters, basil (pesto), mayonnaise and vinaigrettes and of course thousand island dressing.

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Nutrition Information

(average quantity per 100g)

371* (88* Calories)
20.5* g
137 mg
FAT, TOTAL: 0.9 g
Saturated: 31% of total fat
Trans: na
Polyunsaturated: 45% of total fat
Omega 3: na
Alpha-linolenic Acid: 41 mg
Docosahexaenoic Acid: 95 mg
Eicosapentaenoic Acid: 41 mg
Omega 6: na
Monounsaturated: 24% of total fat
Sugars: na
SODIUM: 349* mg


Stock status overview

More information on fish.gov.au