Eastern Rock Lobster

Overview

Rocklobster flesh is firm, with a sweet medium and rich taste; it retains its shape in most styles of cooking. Australia has four main species, eastern, western, southern and tropical. Each species has a slightly different flavour profile based on water temperature and surrounds. Rocklobsters from cooler waters (such as Eastern) are preferred for cooking. The firm flesh holds together well during most cooking methods. Undercook, rather than overcook, them, as they will continue cooking in the residual heat; overcooked Rocklobster will become tough and leathery. Baked or barbecued, grilled, steamed, or sliced for sashimi, rock-lobsters make an excellent seafood dish. Rocklobsters have excellent presentation potential, so take care not to damage the legs and head. Historic and traditional sauces to accompany rocklobster are thermidor and Newburg, but these have fallen from favour with many opting for simpler approaches that accentuate the wonderful sweet subtle flavor of the lobster. Suggestions for other complementary tastes abound. Try citrus, chillies, tarragon, butter, garlic and white wine, or coconut mild curries, or combine in quenelles and mousselines. The shell and carapace can be baked, then boiled to create flavoursome stocks, soups and sauces. A classic approach is to use the shell to prepare as a rich bisque or stock that can be used in risotto or straight up.

Where to buy?

Nutrition Information

(average quantity per 100g)

Energy:
462 (110 Calories)
Protein:
21 g
Cholesterol:
62 mg
FAT, TOTAL: 0.8 g
Saturated: 33% of total fat
Trans: na
Polyunsaturated: 43% of total fat
Omega 3: na
Alpha-linolenic Acid: 80 mg
Docosahexaenoic Acid: 33 mg
Eicosapentaenoic Acid: 46 mg
Omega 6: na
Monounsaturated: 24% of total fat
CARBOHYDRATE: na
Sugars: na
SODIUM: 175 mg

Sustainability

Stock status overview

More information on fish.gov.au