Blacklip Abalone

Overview

The firm flesh of abalones is highly prized in Asian circles, and is central to some of the best Oriental seafood recipes.Abalone meat can be stir-fried, pan-fried, poached, steamed or stewed. However, it is considered by some to be best when eaten raw, in thin strips with wasabi and soy sauce. Another option is lightly braised abalone. With its absorbent texture that draws other flavours beautifully, braised abalone is traditionally prepared in the Cantonese cooking style using garlic, ginger and oyster sauce. If deep frying, the fritter is superb topped with a herb mayonnaise or minced into patties and coated with crumbs of garlic and onion. Citrus-marinated abalone combines well with shallots and parsley when pan-fried in oil or butter. Abalone also makes a wonderful addition to salads.The best way to avoid loss of flavour and to tenderise the meat is to use the slow stewing style of cooking. Alternatively, fry it quickly on a high heat, or serve raw. Canned abalone can be purchased from Chinese and other stores that sell imported Asian goods. It has a firm texture and does not need to be cooked. Drain the flesh, cut it up and add to a soup, casserole or stir-fry.

Where to buy?

Nutrition Information

(average quantity per 100g)

Energy:
Protein:
Cholesterol:
FAT, TOTAL: 0.8 g
Saturated: 31% of total fat
Trans: na
Polyunsaturated: 47% of total fat
Omega 3: na
Alpha-linolenic Acid: 100 mg
Docosahexaenoic Acid: 2 mg
Eicosapentaenoic Acid: 48 mg
Omega 6: na
Monounsaturated: 22% of total fat
CARBOHYDRATE: na
Sugars: na

Sustainability

Stock status overview

More information on fish.gov.au