Australian Blacktip Shark

Overview

Smaller sharks have sweet and delicious flesh, and are popular for their boneless and thick flakes. They have been used for “fish and chips” becuase they have no bones, but should not be overlooked for barbecuing, poaching, braising and baking. Marinate first in oil and lemon to tenderise the flesh. If you buy whole or catch, and are going to barbecue the shark it is good to remove the skin before cooking, to prevent it shrinking and tearing the flesh. Shark is excellent for children as there are no bones and can be used to make great fish nuggets. The texture of shark also makes it a great ingredient for fish cakes or kebabs. Make good use of the firm flesh and enhance the flavour by cooking slowly with strong tomato and herb sauce. Some sharks can have an amonia smell. A handy tip if you are worried about any ammonia odour in shark flesh can be reduced by soaking it in milk, vinegar and water or lemon juice. If you are concerned ask your fish monger or reject when buying the fish.

Where to buy?

Nutrition Information

(average quantity per 100g)

Energy:
420 (100 calories)
Protein:
21.2 g
Cholesterol:
48 mg
FAT, TOTAL: 0.9 g
Saturated: 27% of total fat
Trans: na
Polyunsaturated: 53% of total fat
Omega 3: na
Alpha-linolenic Acid: 30 mg
Docosahexaenoic Acid: 252 mg
Eicosapentaenoic Acid: 17 mg
Omega 6: na
Monounsaturated: 20% of total fat
CARBOHYDRATE: na
Sugars: na
SODIUM: 90 mg